shainagoesplaces:

On the path next to the Ponte Vecchio
Florence, Italy

shainagoesplaces:

On the path next to the Ponte Vecchio

Florence, Italy

  • english dub sailor neptune: i remember my first kiss... it was with [microsoft sam voice] BRAD
  • everydaylouie:

breakfast bunny

    everydaylouie:

    breakfast bunny

    churayl:

    Pakistan is not your talking point, it isn’t your political news of the day, the trending global current affair you want to learn so you seem more cultured to your friends. It’s not your choice blogging topic. It isn’t Gaza or Ferguson. Sometimes spreading awareness can backfire and do more harm than good. Why are you caring about Pakistan now when this protest was under way for the last two weeks and when many people were discontented with the Nawaz regime for the past year? How can you say anything about it when you don’t take loadshedding into account and in fact have never sweltered in the summer without air conditioning because the circulation of electricity is limited and available foremost to the rich and privileged, something directly contributing to the people’s agitation? How can you say anything about it when you know nothing about the military dictatorship Pakistanis suffered in the 1990s and the recent 2000s? Are you only caring about it now because the crisis has escalated, friction and violence have increased and it’s going to make headlines and receive more attention? You will view this event in an isolated vacuum, decontextualized from the factors that produced it in the first place. Martial law is imminent. The bourgeois democracy we suffered has all the traits of a regime, but a military coup cannot help us again. 

    My only request is to be sensitive in how you circulate information. My only request is that you don’t sensationalize it. My only request is that you don’t use language that trivializes and insults the people on the ground just because they’re faraway from you. You cannot understand a political crisis without knowing the 60+ year long history of the country, its institutional dynamics, the praetorianism that has characterized the state since its inception. And most importantly, you cannot understand this without knowing the mood, hope and aspirations of the people in the face of mass poverty, government corruption and military subjugation. The masses are being manipulated and used as pawns. Their rightful rage against bourgeois democracy that is both class exploitative and repressive in freedom of speech is being coopted by highly opportunistic and dishonest politicians cum demagogues, Tahir al-Qadri and Imran Khan, who care more about expanding their power than on nation-building and helping the people, and who are most likely in cahoots with the military. Seasoned Pakistani activist Lal Khan described it best

    Khan is a right-wing politician with religious and national chauvinism at the core of his ideological bearings. Qadri is an impostor mixing religious mysticism and demagogic sloganeering including references to poverty, deprivation and welfare, but this is more rhetorical than any serious programme. Both are staunch supporters of free market economics, foreign investment and neoliberal capitalism and, hypothetically speaking, if they ever came into power, they would be steered by the military, imperialism, and financial institutions like the World Bank and the IMF…

    and

    The PTI of Imran Khan, with its azaadi march, has no real solution for the woes of the populace. Qadri’s revolution does not even have a name, what to say of a concrete programme or a strategy. Both totally fail to call for even the basic of human needs, i.e. free health and education. They will not dare call for the nationalisation of corporate vultures known as the IPPs to end the curse of load shedding. The PTI leadership is actually a reunion of old Aitchisonians. None of them would ever call for the nationalisation of their mother institution, built by the British imperialists to create and educate a class for the perpetuation of their colonial rule. It is an institution reflecting the grandeur of the colonial and postcolonial elite, disgustingly slavish to their imperialist bosses.

    Health and education are the most profitable businesses after the drug trade and ransom in today’s Pakistan. Both these radical forces cannot touch these and other leeching enterprises as their support and finances are dependent on these very entrepreneurs and imperialist monopolies. For that matter, all political parties of the present bourgeois political order are representatives of these different black and grey crony capitalist and feudal classes. These ‘freedom’ and ‘revolution’ marches are in fact primitive putsches to derail and subvert the real tide of a revolutionary tide that can erupt from below. The serious strategists of capital can feel the heat of this seething revolt underneath the surface. They are terrified of a volcanic explosion of society. Once that class struggle erupts with a Marxist leadership it will be unstoppable; the state, clergy and the political elite will be swept away. The capitalist, landlord and imperialist stranglehold shall be obliterated. It will break this boisterous stagnation and society will surge ahead towards a socialist victory. 

    [x]

    What we’re seeing unfolding in Pakistan right now may be an engineered military coup or the army propping up the political puppets that will most closely cater to its interests and appease the severely agitated people. The state police feel threatened by the organized protesters in their tens and thousands and react in police brutality. The economy has suffered under Nawaz, Pakistan has come into the yoke of the IMF and the energy crisis is neverending. The military has already become involved as a so-called ‘mediator’ when in reality it possesses foremost control over the situation because it is the most powerful institution in Pakistani society. Pro-Musharraf and dictatorship people have already come out of the woodwork and are calling for army intervention. In the end, the people lose. For them, both openly military and democratic regimes are exploitative, murderous and oppressive. Keep the average working class Pakistani foremost in mind whenever you blog, tweet, or post about this. They’re the ones who are most adversely affected by this, and they’re the ones paying for it with their lives.

    pomeranianprivilege:

    the thing i hate most about people who preach ‘non-violence’ and ‘peace’ is that they never preach to those in power, you’ll never hear any of them demanding the police stop killing black people, to stop destroying their neighborhoods, and to put their weapons down, and that’s because these people are not against violence, they are only against resistance. 

    Aug. 31 10:28 am

    motiya:

    Please take a minute to generally know what’s going on in Pakistan right now.

    On August 14th, Pakistan’s Independence Day, peaceful demonstrators started a march for the capital in opposition to the current prime minister. Now 17 days in to their peaceful sit in at the prime minister’s house civilians are being attacked and brutalized by the military.

    They are being shot with rubber bullets, tear gas, and shells. Women and children are on the frontline, joined by lower and middle class citizens. It’s not rebels or bad people, its teachers, craftsmen, doctors.

    It is hardly being reported on international media, but a peaceful protest in a democratic country is being met with such hard violence sanctioned by its military, and that’s a very very scary thing. 

    Headlines are making it sound like it is an equal clash, but these are UNARMED CIVILIANS, who are exercising their human right to oppose injustice. They want the current president Nawaz Sharif to resign, and are being attacked for it. Tensions in Pakistan are the direct result of the upper class elite and misuse of power by the military declaring a state of emergency to bypass laws and impose curfew on its citizens, by any force necessary.

    Anti-government protesters begin march on Pakistani capital

    Teargas fired as Pakistan protesters clash with Islamabad police

    Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif Named As Murder Suspect

    peggingwithmalik:

    I need less “every celebrity messes up” and more “your decision to dislike a celebrity based on their fuck ups is valid despite the fact that all celebrities, including ones that you do like, mess up”

    thepeoplesrecord:

9-year-old boy was executed in Chicago: Where is the outrage?August 25, 2014
Antonio Smith, 9 years old, was assassinated the other day.
He was Chicago’s youngest fatal shooting victim this year. He was shot at least four times and fell in a backyard on the South Side.
And when I went out there on 71st and Woodlawn less than 24 hours after he was murdered, here’s what I didn’t see:
I didn’t see protesters waving their hands in the air for network TV cameras. I didn’t see the Revs. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson playing their usual roles in the political race card game.
I didn’t see white college anarchists hiding behind their white plastic Guy Fawkes masks talking about being oppressed by the state. I didn’t see politicians equivocating. But the worst thing I didn’t see was this:
I didn’t see the theatrical outrage that you see in Ferguson, Mo. A white cop in Ferguson — a place most people never heard of just two weeks ago — shoots a black teenager and the nation knows what to do. The actors scream out their roles on cue.
But in Chicago, a black child is assassinated, and Attorney General Eric Holder isn’t on his way here. There are no hashtag campaigns saying #saveourboys. And instead of loud anger, there is numb silence.
"It’s only the second day. I don’t know what will happen," said Helen Cross, 82, a neighbor who lives down the street from the shooting. She’s lived in the neighborhood for 49 years.
"Everybody says it’s a shame," she said. "It was terrible. But nobody’s … nobody is …"
Her voice trailed off.
Angry?
She nodded.
"A lot of people don’t want to be involved until it happens to their family," said her son, Lewis Cross. "And that’s the shame."
The screamers and the race hustlers buzzing in Ferguson like flies have it easy: White cop/black victim is a script that sells, and the TV cameras come running.
But in Chicago, young African-American and Latino men and boys and girls are shot down far too regularly, by neighbors, meaning other black and Latinos.
Venting outrage at police is easier, and it’s politically advantageous. Venting at neighbors is a bit more complicated and dangerous. The neighbors will still be there on the block long after the columnists and the TV cameras leave. People are afraid. They don’t want their children to pay for anything they might say.
"This city is crazy," said neighbor Arnold Caffey, a mechanic from Detroit. "I mean, Detroit is better than this."
We were sitting on his porch out of the rain.
"A baby has been assassinated, and where’s the anger?" he asked. "When that child was shot, some people out there were still drinking, I’m saying a baby has been assassinated, they’re like, well, they don’t care."
What if the shooter had been police officer — a white police officer?
"You know what would happen, the whole Ferguson thing," Caffey said. "But it’s not."
The Rev. Michael Pfleger, pastor at St. Sabina Roman Catholic Church, has consistently condemned the violence in Chicago. He doesn’t flit in or out of town. He’s always here and was scheduled to lead a neighborhood prayer vigil Thursday evening.
"This 9-year-old boy — in my mind — when you get multiple shots for a 9-year-old boy in a back alley, that’s an execution," he said in a telephone interview before the event. "That’s not a drive-by, that’s not an accident. That sounds like an execution."
He’s been outspoken about Ferguson, but he knows that moral outrage is undercut if there’s silence over the assassination of a child.
"We cannot simply be outraged about something that happens someplace else and get immune to what happens at home," he said. "This is pure evil.
"We have to be absolutely outraged. And we have to say, ‘We’re going to find out who you are, and we’re going to turn you in because you’re not going to get by with this. You can’t kill a 9-year-old kid and go home and eat McDonald’s and watch TV.’"
Antonio Smith was shot in a backyard that borders a railroad viaduct on 71st Street. To the east, the gang that runs things is called Sircon City. To the west, a group called Pocket Town runs the show. Police say he was not a gang member.
Cynthia Smith-Thigpen, a retired Chicago Public Schools teacher, talked about the lack of public outrage.
"There’s shamelessness to the silence over this boy’s death," she said. "It’s like, ‘Oh, another child dead in Chicago.’ Perhaps we’re all numb to what goes on in this city."

In the alley, on hot, rainy afternoon, three men sweated through their suits. They weren’t politicians or cable TV screamers. They were detectives working a heater case.

Out there was a concrete pad where a garage once stood, and thick grass in the yard and bushes around the edges. And there was the rain and the silence in Pocket Town.
I stood off to the side and pictured Antonio in my mind. Was he running? Were his hands raised the way activists said Michael Brown’s hands were raised in Ferguson?
Antonio was a baby. He didn’t allegedly steal cigars or threaten a shopkeeper or punch a cop. He was 9 years old. He was targeted. He was murdered.
"People need to be angry, but this isn’t TV, and some people really don’t care," said neighbor Tony Miller, who has a son about Antonio’s age. "And people who don’t live here don’t want to know, but people get killed all the time."
Source
Antonio’s funeral is scheduled for this Saturday morning. If anyone has any information about any rallies, organizing meetings or any support funds for his family, please feel free to message us. 

    thepeoplesrecord:

    9-year-old boy was executed in Chicago: Where is the outrage?
    August 25, 2014

    Antonio Smith, 9 years old, was assassinated the other day.

    He was Chicago’s youngest fatal shooting victim this year. He was shot at least four times and fell in a backyard on the South Side.

    And when I went out there on 71st and Woodlawn less than 24 hours after he was murdered, here’s what I didn’t see:

    I didn’t see protesters waving their hands in the air for network TV cameras. I didn’t see the Revs. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson playing their usual roles in the political race card game.

    I didn’t see white college anarchists hiding behind their white plastic Guy Fawkes masks talking about being oppressed by the state. I didn’t see politicians equivocating. But the worst thing I didn’t see was this:

    I didn’t see the theatrical outrage that you see in Ferguson, Mo. A white cop in Ferguson — a place most people never heard of just two weeks ago — shoots a black teenager and the nation knows what to do. The actors scream out their roles on cue.

    But in Chicago, a black child is assassinated, and Attorney General Eric Holder isn’t on his way here. There are no hashtag campaigns saying #saveourboys. And instead of loud anger, there is numb silence.

    "It’s only the second day. I don’t know what will happen," said Helen Cross, 82, a neighbor who lives down the street from the shooting. She’s lived in the neighborhood for 49 years.

    "Everybody says it’s a shame," she said. "It was terrible. But nobody’s … nobody is …"

    Her voice trailed off.

    Angry?

    She nodded.

    "A lot of people don’t want to be involved until it happens to their family," said her son, Lewis Cross. "And that’s the shame."

    The screamers and the race hustlers buzzing in Ferguson like flies have it easy: White cop/black victim is a script that sells, and the TV cameras come running.

    But in Chicago, young African-American and Latino men and boys and girls are shot down far too regularly, by neighbors, meaning other black and Latinos.

    Venting outrage at police is easier, and it’s politically advantageous. Venting at neighbors is a bit more complicated and dangerous. The neighbors will still be there on the block long after the columnists and the TV cameras leave. People are afraid. They don’t want their children to pay for anything they might say.

    "This city is crazy," said neighbor Arnold Caffey, a mechanic from Detroit. "I mean, Detroit is better than this."

    We were sitting on his porch out of the rain.

    "A baby has been assassinated, and where’s the anger?" he asked. "When that child was shot, some people out there were still drinking, I’m saying a baby has been assassinated, they’re like, well, they don’t care."

    What if the shooter had been police officer — a white police officer?

    "You know what would happen, the whole Ferguson thing," Caffey said. "But it’s not."

    The Rev. Michael Pfleger, pastor at St. Sabina Roman Catholic Church, has consistently condemned the violence in Chicago. He doesn’t flit in or out of town. He’s always here and was scheduled to lead a neighborhood prayer vigil Thursday evening.

    "This 9-year-old boy — in my mind — when you get multiple shots for a 9-year-old boy in a back alley, that’s an execution," he said in a telephone interview before the event. "That’s not a drive-by, that’s not an accident. That sounds like an execution."

    He’s been outspoken about Ferguson, but he knows that moral outrage is undercut if there’s silence over the assassination of a child.

    "We cannot simply be outraged about something that happens someplace else and get immune to what happens at home," he said. "This is pure evil.

    "We have to be absolutely outraged. And we have to say, ‘We’re going to find out who you are, and we’re going to turn you in because you’re not going to get by with this. You can’t kill a 9-year-old kid and go home and eat McDonald’s and watch TV.’"

    Antonio Smith was shot in a backyard that borders a railroad viaduct on 71st Street. To the east, the gang that runs things is called Sircon City. To the west, a group called Pocket Town runs the show. Police say he was not a gang member.

    Cynthia Smith-Thigpen, a retired Chicago Public Schools teacher, talked about the lack of public outrage.

    "There’s shamelessness to the silence over this boy’s death," she said. "It’s like, ‘Oh, another child dead in Chicago.’ Perhaps we’re all numb to what goes on in this city."

    Out there was a concrete pad where a garage once stood, and thick grass in the yard and bushes around the edges. And there was the rain and the silence in Pocket Town.

    I stood off to the side and pictured Antonio in my mind. Was he running? Were his hands raised the way activists said Michael Brown’s hands were raised in Ferguson?

    Antonio was a baby. He didn’t allegedly steal cigars or threaten a shopkeeper or punch a cop. He was 9 years old. He was targeted. He was murdered.

    "People need to be angry, but this isn’t TV, and some people really don’t care," said neighbor Tony Miller, who has a son about Antonio’s age. "And people who don’t live here don’t want to know, but people get killed all the time."

    Source

    Antonio’s funeral is scheduled for this Saturday morning. If anyone has any information about any rallies, organizing meetings or any support funds for his family, please feel free to message us. 

    It is now 3 weeks since Michael Brown was murdered by Ferguson PD Officer Darren Wilson. Officer Darren Wilson still has not been arrested, charged, or even brought to prison or court for the murder of Michael Brown.

    thepoliticalfreakshow:

    #JusticeForMichaelBrown